Archive for the ‘Danish’ Category

Is it a bird, a shiny corset or an accessory for a men’s dress shirt? According to its manufacturer, the item pictured to the right is none of those things. It is instead a silver bracelet shaped like a shirt cuff designed for the “woman of today,” according the press release. The “Smithy Cuffs” collection comes from the distinuished House of Georg Jensen, founded in 1904 by Mr. Jensen of Denmark.
At first glance, I thought these cuffs with leather straps might be intended for androgynous lads, to be worn, possibly, as a complement to a black leather jacket or a starched white shirt. Or perhaps as a touch of bling for bunnies in the Playboy mansion?
Of course, the jewelry would certainly work for chic female Dandies.
But what would Georg say?

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Uniforms worn by federal soldiers who took part in the blood-drenched American Civil War inspire the Fall/Winter “Uncle Sam” collection of Danish designer Asger Juel Larsen.

Asger’s childhood fascination with the 1860s gets twisted in a Gothic direction in this collection, which uses hard and soft fabrics, from cashmere and wool, to leather and tough Japanese denim. The boots were designed in collaboration with British rock n’ roll footwear brand Underground.

Asger, who graduated from the London College of Fashion in 2009, isn’t the only Danish designer giving a nod to the U.S. Civil War. As previously observed, Soulland’s designer Silas Adler also looks back to the 1860s in his A/W “Civilized” collection.
Photographer: Ellis Scott

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The postal service in Denmark today unveiled two fashion stamps at City Hall in Copenhagen which pay tribute to the contribution to Danish culture made by fashion designers. Accessories by Silas Adler, the founder of the Soulland menswear brand, are featured on one of the stamps, while a sketch by Malene Birger of a design for women appears on the other. These aren’t the only designers in the Nordic region who can brag about stamp tributes. Minna Parikka, the queen of sexy high-heels, was recently honored with a postage stamp in home country Finland.

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Victor Nylander is the fresh new face of both Dior Homme and Versace in their SS11 campaigns. Willy Vanderperre shot a video and eight photos of the 18-year-old from Roskilde, Denmark for Dior Homme, while the maestro-himself—-fashion photographer Mario Testino –used the tall Dane for the Versace campaign.

In the Dior Homme video, it appears that Victor is having a pleasant snooze in the sunlight.

Nylander, who got discovered by sending his photos to Scoop Models, told the Fashion Spot blog that his idea of fun is hanging out with his friends and watching soccer. His favorite piece of clothing is some light blue Converse.

He is signed with Scoop and Ford Models.

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The Soulland A/W 2011 collection, called “Civilized,” is inspired by the one of the greatest conflicts in American history: the battle between the North and the South over states’ rights and slavery. Danish designer Silas Adler has taken a close look at the life of soldiers during the bloody and tragic war, which culminated in 1865 following the famous battles of Gettysburg and Vicksburg.

Adler and his colleagues at the Copenhagen-based company studied the uniforms of the soldiers who fought the war and the flags under which they served.

“We were particularly inspired by the portraits of the time and the sense of honor in the soldiers that comes across in their portraits,” the designer says in a written comment. Special attention was paid the soldiers’ pockets and collars.

“There were many different levels of status in the troops and their clothing showed where in society they belonged. Within these layers we especially looked at the hobo soldiers. Their layering was a great inspiration throughout the development of the collection.”

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I didn’t meet Henrik Vibskov on Thrusday evening, but in a sense I did. A new issue of a new magazine had a release party at Riche, hosted by a gentleman in a Santa Claus costume. The magazine Art Lover contains an in-depth interview with Vibskov, the brilliant Danish fashion designer who surprises and delights with fashion shows similar to art performances.

Vibskov explains in Art Lover why the theatrical fashion shows he stages in Copenhagen are open to the general public: “It provides an important mix of real people. That means you not only get VIPs, but also young students, old people and people who just happen to be in the area by accident, people who are jogging or out with their dog. To have only invited people attend would be like having a concert only for music critics, rather boring,” Vibskov tells interviewer Sanna Samuelsson. (more…)

What would happen if you took one talented stylist, one writer, two designers and one interior decorator and gave them free reign to each create their own special environment using fashion, home interior products, art and accessories? The answer can be glimpsed at Studio Sankt Paul on the south side of Stockholm. The PR agency promotes an interesting mix of products for their network of stylists, journalists, interior decorators and other design afficianados. (more…)

Mildh Press probably represents more Danish labels than anyone else in Sweden. Therefore, when I paid a visit to the PR agency’s showroom this week, I took the opportunity to ask a question of Helena Mildh, founder of the agency that bears her name: What makes fashion from Denmark special:

“Danish designers tend to use more fur, and favor exclusive materials and embroideries. They also like more bohemian styles than the Dutch or the Germans, for example,” she explained.

The Danes are fond of tunics and harem trousers and appreciate a luxurious look. Do they like more feminine styles than the minimalism-obsessed Swedes? Yes, that too. It is interesting how the Scandinavians, although they share a common history and borders, still have slight differences in their fashion preferences. (more…)

What will Scandinavian kids be wearing in the Spring? We got a glimpse of the styles to come when Polarn O. Pyret and OneTwoTen staged a children’s show in Stockholm’s House of Culture.

A children’s fashion show, by the way, is a great way to start the week. The small people who took a trek around the circular runway put every adult in the audience in a good mood, even on a grey Monday morning .
Karina Lundel, senior designer at premier children’s label Polarn O. Pyret presented a Spring collection which included a wide variety of inspirations, everything from the minimalism of the 90s to hippie styles of the 1970s. Climbing aboard the unisex bandwagon, Polarn O. Pyret is now offering shirts with flowery patterns for both boys and girls. (more…)


Take one person with a bright idea, add a second one, a third one and keep going. If one collects enough clever and ambitious people together in one room a critical mass is achieved, and the result is an explosion of creativity. That is what happened in Stockholm last night, as some 30 fashion designers, artists, and other folk from Iceland, Finland, Sweden, Denmark and Norway—and some brilliant Estonians—got together in a gallery to chat, show their projects, and network. (more…)